Buildings and Architecture

First Courthouse – two-story log structure, built in the spring of 1782, on the northwest corner of Main Cross and Main Streets, replaced 1788.

Second Courthouse – two-story limestone building, completed in fall of 1788, on the east end of the “Publick Square” on Main Street, built by Captain Cape, demolished 1806.

Third Courthouse – three-story brick building, finished in 1806, with two...

During the 1880s, the Federal Building was built on Main Street, at Walnut, to house the post office, custom bureau, courts and other government agencies.

In 1934, the Federal government built a combination post office and courthouse at 11 Barr Street....

In October 1897, H. L. Rowe, a local architect, prepared updated plans to rebuild the courthouse using fire-proof materials.  During November 1897 the reconstruction was let for bids, however, the lowest bid of $175,000 were rejected by the Fiscal Court.[i]  In October 1897, the Combs Lumber Company removed the...

During the summer of 1775, a small group of settlers from Fort Harrod established a camp near a large spring, along the banks of Middle Branch (now Town Branch) of Elkhorn Creek.  They named the camp Lexington, in honor of the first battle of the American Revolution.

In December 1776, the Kentucky Colony of Virginia was established by the Virginia General Assembly, with Harrodsburg as the County seat.  The...

In August 1882, the Legislature authorized a new courthouse for Fayette County.  The act required the voters of Fayette County to approve the issuance of county bonds to pay for the new building.  The amount of bonds[1] was limited to $100,000.  If approved, the County Magistrates were required to appoint a...

After James Ben Ali Haggin’s purchase of Elmendorf Farm, he began to develop plans for a palatial mansion as a wedding gift to his wife.

In March 1900, the Haggins arrived in Kentucky, from New York, to spend a few weeks planning and reviewing improvements to the farm, including the new main residence.  The Haggins temporarily used the old residence on the Old Kenney Place (the Carter-Harrison dwelling). ...

It was built in 1815 intended for a large family.  Originally, it had 12 rooms on two floors, a large oval main room with a dome ceiling, two octagonal twin parlors, fan windows identical to the doorway at the Hunt Morgan house.    The Marquis LaFayette purportedly...

In February 1788, the Town Trustees approved the construction of a new courthouse.  The commission consisted of Edward Payne, Robert Todd, Levi Todd, Thomas Lewis, Robert Johnson, James Trotter and William Campbell.  The Commissioners selected the eastern portion of the “publick square[1] lot,” on Main Street....

In 2002, a pair of new courthouses was completed on North Limestone, to replace the old building on Main Street.  The matching buildings were named the Robert F. Stephens Courthouses.  Stephens was the former Chief Justice of the Kentucky Supreme Court.

The Circuit Court Building was built at 120 North Limestone, the west end of the block bounded by Main Street, Limestone and Short Streets.  The District...

Grand and elegant, Spindletop Hall is a treasure that was acquired by the University of Kentucky (UK) in 1959.  Originally built with oil money from the famous Texas Spindletop Oilfield, the extraordinary mansion has been a Lexington showplace since its construction was...

In December 1805, the county court appointed a commission for building a new courthouse.  The commissioners were William Dudley, John Parker, Hezekiah Harrison, Leonard Young and Thomas January.  The commissioners were ordered to “report to the next County Court plans for a three-story brick Court House on the dimensions of not less than 40 by 60 feet, with the probable cost of covering said house.”  In addition...

The Victorian Era, for which these buildings are named is so called because of England’s Queen Victoria who reigned from 1837 to 1901.  One of the greatest rulers of English History, she served as Queen for 63 years, until her death at age 82.  In 1861 her husband...

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